Dutch law to restrict use of bonuses

Dutch law to restrict use of bonuses

Proposed Dutch gambling laws have been amended to restrict the use of bonuses.

Published 15th July 2020

Proposed Dutch gambling laws have been amended to restrict the use of bonuses.

The Remote Gambling Act, which is scheduled to be implemented from next year, has been submitted to the European Commission, where it will be decided whether it is compatible with European Union law.

The Act was passed by Parliament last February, but the final draft submitted to Brussels includes restrictions on the use of bonuses, with operators required to explain all terms under which they are awarded and an obligation to allow players to turn off from receiving future bonuses.

Licensed operators will be prohibited from advertising gambling-related services between 6am and 9pm under the amended act, with the sole exception of “neutral” sponsorship mentions made through media partners.

Operators will be eligible for five-year licences, with Dutch gambling regulator the Kansspelautoriteit (KSA) to make a final decision on applications within six months of their submission.

Licences will cover peer-to-peer casino games (such as poker), casino games where the players bet against the house, sports betting and betting on horse racing, and not online lotteries.

For sports betting, licensees may not offer odds on youth or amateur competitions, or on events that are considered easy to manipulate. Furthermore, the sports on which betting can be offered will be determined by a blacklist, which will include all sports not covered.

As well as the usual boilerplate on applicants’ probity and the need for defined policies to prevent money laundering, uphold sporting integrity and tackle gambling addiction, the regulations state that players must not be permitted to bet using credit.

Some four years after the legislation was passed by the country’s Lower House, the legislation is now open for comments from interested parties and stakeholders who can submit feedback on the proposed measures over the next three months before the European Commission decides whether it is compatible with European Union law.

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